Ask Dr Gord

We love to hear from you!  If you have a question for Dr Gord, please email us at info@fortmcmurraysmiles.com
 


I think my teeth are in great shape - why do I have to come in for cleanings?  

This is one of the most common questions I hear.  The oral hygiene you practice at home—brushing at least two times a day and flossing every day—is great for keeping your smile healthy and beautiful between visits to our office, but it doesn’t take the place of the more in-depth cleaning we’re able to perform at Franklin Dental.  Here, not only can we perform more comprehensive cleaning, but we can also perform fluoride treatments, take actions to prevent or reverse gum disease, or even tell you about a variety of dental options to keep your breath feeling and smelling fresh!

If you’ve lapsed in your regular dental checkups in our office, please don't put it off.  Taking the time for regular cleanings and checkups can save you pain and money in the future.



There are so many different toothbrushes on the market!   How do I choose the right one?

There are so many different types of toothbrushes in the marketplace that it can be a difficult choice to know what is best.  Our office considers any toothbrush that that provides you both a good tool for removal of plaque, plus is safe for the gums (soft bristles) as being best for your oral health.

When it comes to choosing between a manual or electric toothbrush, both can effectively and thoroughly clean your teeth, so it really becomes a matter of personal preference and manual dexterity.

Children may enjoy brushing with a powered toothbrush. Persons who have difficulty using a non-powered toothbrush due to issues of manual dexterity (eg. arthritis) may find a powered toothbrush more comfortable and easier to use.

Whether you decide on manual or powered, choose a toothbrush that you like and find easy to use, one which has soft bristles so as not to damage the gums, and make sure to brush twice a day to thoroughly clean all the surfaces of your teeth of the plaque.


I was told I have Gum Disease? What is it?

Gingivitis is the medical term for early gum disease, or periodontal disease. In general, gum disease can be caused by long-term exposure to plaque, the sticky but colorless film on teeth that forms after eating or sleeping.

Gum disease originates in the gums, where infections form from harmful bacteria and other materials left behind from eating. Early warning signs include chronic bad breath, tender or painful swollen gums and minor bleeding after brushing or flossing. In many cases, however, gingivitis can go unnoticed. The infections can eventually cause the gums to separate from the teeth, creating even greater opportunities for infection and decay.

Although gum disease is the major cause of tooth loss in adults, in many cases it is avoidable.

If gingivitis goes untreated, more serious problems such as abscesses, bone loss or periodontitis can occur.

Periodontitis is treated in a number of ways. One method, called root planing, involved cleaning and scraping below the gum line to smooth the roots. If effective, this procedure helps the gums reattach themselves to the tooth structure.

Pregnancy has also been known to cause a form of gingivitis. This has been linked to hormonal changes in the woman's body that promote plaque production.


I've heard some horror stories about sterilization of dental instruments. How do you sterilize instruments in your office?

Thank you for asking!  We're very proud to be using the latest in sterilization equipment and methods to ensure patient safety and comfort. With increased public awareness of global bacterial and viral outbreaks, we would like to provide you with some information about how we practice infection control.

All dental staff involved in patient care to use appropriate protective garb such as gloves, masks and eyewear. After each patient visit, gloves are discarded, hands are washed with an antibacterial soap or a hand sanitizer, and a new pair of gloves is used for the next patient.

All surfaces in the treatment rooms that come in contact with staff or patients are covered with barriers and disinfected before and after each patient.

All instruments used on patients are either single use (disposable) or sterilized after every patient use. The sterilization procedure involves a series of thorough steps that are performed after each use on a single patient. The instruments are first washed. Then they are soaked in a disinfectant while run through an ‘ultra-sonic’ machine to further loosen any remaining particles from the instruments. Finally, they are sterilized under pressure with chemicals, or steam.

We conduct chemical and biological tests daily to ensure the effectiveness of our techniques and equipment.